A Devotion May Be Someone's Only Bible

Spirit & Trust

Trust is hard. It’s easy to say there is trust but actually taking the step – making the leap into mid-air without a visible net is the most difficult thing man can do. But with the Spirit of God our leap lands us safe in His palm.

A Bookmark Reminder from 1958

Out of desperation, I found a bookmark my father had given me in 1958.

Talking heads on television seemed to think the way to address the turmoil of the present situation was by hatefulness and negativity. Turning away into the still quiet voice of the Spirit, I reached for the books I keep next to my easy chair and found Dad’s gift.

After a lifetime of violence and sin, my father had been saved later in life and truly became “a new creature.” During lunchtime, he sat in his car in front of the union hall where he was the hard-fisted president and listened to Vernon McGee, a famous Bible teacher from long ago.

Shortly after my father’s salvation, he said, “Son, here’s a little book that has helped me a lot. Maybe you’d like to read it.” Then he handed me Sit, Walk, Stand by Watchman Nee, the father of the indigenous Christian church in China, which grew to millions of members. Watchman died in prison in 1972 from the Chinese government’s hateful imprisonment.

After a lifetime of living—and being blessed with five children and twelve grandchildren—I reached for Watchman’s booklet, a first edition printed in London in 1958. A beautiful bookmark with a picture of Jesus tending His flock on one side and the 23rd Psalm on the other fell out.

Years before, I had stood before a congregation of people and, honoring Dad’s wishes, read the Psalm. Tears ran down my face. I missed Dad so much. I guess I still do. 

I refreshed my heart with the little book Dad had given me and discovered the following:

  • First, we should sit or rest in our relationship with Christ. The Christian life doesn’t begin with walking; it begins with sitting.
     
  • Second, we should walk in love by being pro-active and walking in the power of the Holy Spirit.  
     
  • Third, we must stand by putting on the armor of God.

Take power walks each day in the power of the Spirit, who enables you to stand up under the Devil’s intimidation.

(Photo courtesy of pixabay.)

(For more devotions, visit Christian Devotions.)

 



The Message Before the Sermon

The choir members stood quietly in their places.

The vibrant chords of the organ signaled the start of the Sunday morning service. I settled into the comfortable pew, moving a bit to the right past a dated felt hat blocking my vision. But wait. I saw a rocking movement working its way up the wide front steps toward the choir loft, a flowing robe with an uneven gait continuing upward to the men’s section at the top of the platform.

Having grown up as a pastor’s daughter, I knew coming in late was unacceptable, but choosing to use the platform steps instead of the side door was … well, forbidden. I shook my head. Somebody’s in big trouble.

As the man arrived at the empty place next to another choir member, a welcoming arm reached out and gave a strong side hug and a broad smile. The heartfelt hug spoke clearly, I’m so glad you’re here. You’re a part of our group. I thought you weren’t coming.

I realized then the latecomer was a member of our church’s “Special Friends” group. My stomach clenched. My hands went cold. Had I sunk so low that now I criticized a brave special needs man who was a member of our church choir?  Growing up in church, I was aware of criticism. Now, many years later, had I become a criticizer?

My face felt wet. I wiped away the tears. Lord, please forgive me. I’m so sorry. Help me reach out with kindness to people. I swallowed and continued my silent plea. Fill my heart with compassion instead of critical thoughts.

I don’t remember the sermon that Sunday, but I will never forget the message.

Instead of judging, ask God to teach you how to love, show kindness, and accept others.

(Photo courtesy of pixabay.)

(For more devotions, visit Christian Devotions.)



Father Knows Best

From year to year, I forget that seasons are an allegory of the spirit.

Winter has passed, and spring has come, and with it new hope, new growth, and new vision. I don’t care for winter, except for the beautiful holiday time. Yet I’ve come to know it brings a painful but necessary spiritual pruning. Pain can quickly bury those memories of beautiful colored flowers, the warm sun, and the singing birds, but those memories are my rod and staff.

The carnal way of facing painful situations involves moving through the difficulty as quickly as possible, but God might not remove the trial. Our Father knows best. He’ll guide us through by helping us recall His goodness and by granting us strength for the journey. He doesn’t want us to dwell on the pain. He wants us to give thanks during and through the painful circumstances.

I often thought God’s purpose for the trials was for me to give Him glory, which is partially true. But even more is for us to know Him and His trustworthiness well enough that we can give thanksgiving while walking through the valley of the shadow of death—knowing His faithfulness will resolve the problem in His timing. God did this for Job by restoring all his riches and more.

The Father already knows what we need. He wants to prune the rocks and weeds of our soul so we will trust Him for our needs. 

Surrender to God in your trial because surrender is an act of faith that shows Him your trust.

(Photo courtesy of pixabay.)

(For more devotions, visit Christian Devotions.)



Perfectly Placed

“When will I get accustomed to being alone?” my friend asked.

My newly-widowed friend told me she was having a hard time saying “I” when she had used “we” for forty years. I assured her she would gradually speak with singular pronouns.    

As one with seven years of widowhood on the calendar, I told her everyone’s timetable differed. The quiet and aloneness are always present, but she would slowly develop her routine and add activity to her days.

Eating alone is one of the biggest challenges singles face. Cooking for one when recipes are designed for four servings means eating leftovers for days. My friend Lucy, who never married and is now retired, finds this season of her life quiet and difficult.

God places the solitary in families, but not unless we extend the invitation and place them in our home.

When I moved to a new community, people at church invited me to their homes or out to lunch. On the first Sunday of each month, a group of widows meets for a potluck lunch in one of our homes. Our group is a family—the family of God—and God has placed us together.

My husband and I once invited singles to our home for holiday meals if they couldn’t travel to see family. They enjoyed being around our children, and our girls witnessed the value of extending hospitality to others.  

Make a list of people you know who are alone. Especially those who can’t reciprocate. Invite them to have coffee with you in the warmth of your home or host a meal for them.

(Photo courtesy of pixabay.)

(For more devotions, visit Christian Devotions.)



Lonely Eyes Sometimes Cry

Deep inside hearts, loneliness can create islands of doubt which then can grow into dim dens. Succumbing to darkness means nurturing light no longer appears.

Eyes made for the light fail to serve in the darkness, producing doubt and fear. Lonely eyes toil for relief when lost in darkness, and lonely eyes sometime cry.

Strangely, when two hearts meet—having similar blurred vision and faint courage—a dark fog can lift, restoring sight and easing needs as blinded eyes become one.

Hearts are filled with expectation as the world becomes new. Two hearts reach out with a new-found strength that lonely souls were without.

Yet a young lady cried softly by herself and longed for her mother’s arms. She wondered whether life was better alone with privacy as her best friend. A young man wondered the same.

Wisely, this confused couple made good choices and ran toward each other’s arms for comfort. Quiet breezes blew through the trees overhead as a concerned Father’s Spirit found ease.

Many years later, this gentle couple—my wife and I—have scars hidden beneath the wrinkles. Wisely, we still run toward each other’s arms to find the Spirit’s peace when life tries to tear us apart. We claim Jesus’ promise: Come to me you who are heavy laden, and I will give you peace. Together, we find comfort in His arms.

Pray with someone when your lonely eyes cry, and your heart will find a song of victory. As my wife and I approach seventy and eighty, we have found this verse has often applied as we have passed many years in this veil of tears. We are blessed that these words have been our song. We truly belong together.

We all cry sometimes along this rocky and dirty road called “life,” but God is always near to wipe away the tears.  

Pray with someone when your lonely eyes cry, and your heart will find a song of victory.

(Photo courtesy of pixabay.)

(For more devotions, visit Christian Devotions.)



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